HoTs and DoTs: A Restoration Druid and Shadow Priest

All the Colours of the Rainbow:
Dungeon Groups 101

It takes 5

It takes 5

Lathere and I love our PVE. Always have.

I remember, way back in the day when I would wander Stormwind and get lost, Lath told me a story about going into this cave with some other people in Westfall and killing bad guys. She told me she wasn’t just a Warrior – she was the tank! And then she said to me “all these abilities I had, that I didn’t understand when I got them from the trainer, make so much more sense now!”.

Your character is designed for group play. But there are so many players out there, successfully questing through to 80, who have never set foot in a challenging instance designed for 5 players at their level.

I’ve read so many comments like the one below:

I am absolutely scared to death about my first group run. As of now my other half & I just wait till we’re over leveled and just run through with the two of us. If one of us screws up, oh well. The thought of me DPS-ing in a new group is just terrifying. I don’t want to screw up and do the innumerable fail/death methods, but I know I will. Probably a lot. And reading stories like this, (even though wonderfully entertaining to read!) make this fear just that much worse.

I hate to think of all the players missing out on this game experience. Imagine what WoW would be like if they removed all the quests. That’s what I feel the game would be like if they removed all the Dungeons. Not really a game that I’d bother playing at all. What I’m trying to say is: if you play World of Warcraft without experiencing a 5 man Dungeon you’re not really experiencing World of Wacraft at all.

Most of our readers are raiders. At least, I think they/you are based on the feedback we’ve received. And I know that most of what I’m going to say in this post is going to make you think “comon Cass, who doesn’t already know that?”.

But this post isn’t really for you. It’s for the people in your guild on “Friend” rank. It’s for your aunt, cousin or your little brother who you talked into playing WoW. It’s for all the players who, mistakenly, feel that they just aren’t good enough to hold their own in a pick up group with four strangers.

Most people have some fear of failure. If your fear comes from:

  1. Not knowing the instance and what to do
  2. Not understanding what other classes/group members can do
  3. Being criticised by other players

then by the time you get to the bottom of this post you’ll know more than enough to step into your first Dungeon. You might even know more than some of the other players in your group!

1. Knowing the Instance and What To Do

Try to start with a level appropriate instance for you. Tell the group, or the person that invited you, that you wish to DPS (this is the most similar game play to leveling).

The absolute golden rule of 5 man groups is simple. You will never stuff up if you follow it, I promise. Just follow this one rule:

The Golden Rule: Help your tank kill stuff.

Just click on what he’s killing and start hitting your attack keys. If you’re hitting your tank’s targets with a physical weapon like a sword, dagger, axe or mace make sure you are always attacking the enemy’s back.

And you really don’t need to know the instance itself. Scarlet Monastery, Sunken Temple or the Halls of Stone are really all the same with different scenery. You’ll fight enemies in small packs, then you’ll fight a bigger dude for a few minutes until it’s dead.

2. Understanding What the Other Group Members Can Do

Working in a small group can be very satisfying and every class brings something unique. However, if you’ve never grouped up with 4 other players to work together, or if you have only played a few of the 9 classes, then you might be a little bit confused and overwhelmed by about what’s going on around you.

Below is a list, organised by class, which covers some of the abilities that each class brings to group play. Read your own class section carefully so that you’re aware of your own spells and abilities that you might be asked to use in your group.

The only classes that can tank are: Death Knights, Druids, Paladins and Warriors
(and, at very low levels, Shamans).

The only classes that can heal are: Druids, Paladins, Priests and Shamans

All classes do a good job at killing stuff. Don’t assume that because you have a Shaman or a Priest in your group that they will be healing. Or that the Paladin in your group will be willing to tank.

A Short Note on Crowd Control

Many classes are blessed with abilities that can, for a brief period, stop an enemy from attacking. A Mage, of example, can target an enemy during combat and temporarily turn them into a sheep using Polymorph.

A 5 man group can make use of Crowd Control to, well, control their enemy mobs, stop them from wreaking havoc, and kill them off one at a time.

All Crowd Control spells/abilities can be used during combat, except for a Rogue’s Sap. If a Rogue in your group has been asked to Sap an enemy your group will need to wait for them to do that before charging in to attack. If any other class has been asked to apply Crowd Control they usually will do so immediately after the tank/group attacks. So, upon entering combat, a Mage’s first action will be to select his assigned Crowd Control target and cast Polymorph. He will then follow the golden rule and help kill whatever the tank is killing.

It’s often not necessary to Crowd Control every single creature in a group. Each player can only apply their Crowd Control ability to one enemy mob at a time. 1 Mage cannot Polymorph 2 targets at once. However, removing just 1 enemy from the throng can significantly reduce the amount of damage your tank is receiving thus making the whole group’s success more likely.

Never offer to Crowd Control on your first instance run. Always Crowd Control if (a) you have been specifically asked to and (b) someone has marked a target for you to apply your Crowd Control to.

Death Knight

Death Knights, regardless of what talents they have chosen, can tank very well at a moment’s notice. Death Knights have abilities which can slow down an enemy’s movement but none completely incapacitate an enemy from dealing damage. Therefore they are rarely (if ever) asked to Crowd Control.

If you have a Death Knight in the party you can expect to receive the short duration buff, Horn of Winter, for the entire dungeon run which significantly increases your Agility and Strength.

Druid

Druids, depending on which form they take on and which type of gear they wear, can take damage as a tank (in Bear form, with talents in Feral), can deal damage from melee range (in Cat form, with talents in Feral), can deal damage from far away (in Moonkin form, with talents in Balance) or can heal the party (in Tree form, with talents in Restoration).

All Druids have the unique ability to resurrect a player during combat, although only once every 20 minutes. This is referred to as Battle Resurrection or Battle Rez, or Brez even though the spell is called Rebirth. This ability is often used to bring the tank or healer back to life quickly mid-fight so that the entire group does not die. DPS players are rarely brezzed during combat and will usually be ressurected when the group ends combat. Druids can also resurrect as many players as necessary when out of combat.

Druids have three Crowd Control abilities sometimes used 5 man dungeons. They can Cyclone an enemy. They can send a Beast to sleep using Hibernate. They can stop melee enemies coming into range with Entangling Roots.

Druids can increase your resistance to magical attacks and increase all your attributes by casting Gift of the Wild on you at the start of your instance.

Hunter

Hunters bring two unique contributions to a group aside from dealing a huge amount of hurt:

They can Misdirect (often abbreviated to “MD”) creatures to attack particular party members. This means that they may be asked to apply misdirect to the tank and then shoot at the enemy. Any shots fired by the Hunter during the period that misdirect is applied to the tank will cause the enemy to attack the tank and not the Hunter. Your group’s tank may ask a Hunter to do this as a method to initiate combat or “pull”.

They can control an enemy mob by placing a Freezing Trap in the enemy’s path. Once the enemy stands on the trap they will be frozen in an ice block. A Hunter can lay a second trap before the first ice block wears off thus keeping that mob incapacitated indefinitely (this is sometimes referred to as “chain trapping”).

Both abilities can take some practice to get right, so be patient. A good Hunter will endeavor to master these abilities.

Mage

Mages are usually the very first players requested to Crowd Control, if your party deems it necessary to control anything at all. Polymorph is a very reliable method of controlling enemies in 5 man dungeons – it can be applied quickly, can be applied during combat, can be reapplied once it wears off and it can applied to the most common enemy mobs (Humanoids).

They can also conjure, using just their mana, food and drinks for your party when you first arrive. You may be asked to click on a Ritual of Refreshment portal to help the Mage create a table, which you can click on to loot stacks of food.

Mages can cast Arcane Brilliance to increase your Intellect.

Paladin

A heavily armored Paladin can tank (Protection talent spec, or “Prot”). A Paladin with spell power gear can heal your group (Holy talent spec).

Paladins, especially while leveling, can DPS very well if they have talented into the Retribution talent tree, or “Ret”. They have access to their own form of Crowd Control: a stun that makes a single target go all dizzy looking. It’s called Repentance.

If you have a Paladin in your group, or several Paladins in your group they can buff your character using Blessings. This is usually applied by the Paladin to your character as your group prepares for the first attack. If you play a melee DPSer (like a Rogue) you’ll most likely be blessed with Blessing of Might. All other players will most likely be blessed with Blessing of Kings.

Paladins can resurrect dead party members when combat has ended.

Priest

A Priest who arrives to the instance in Shadowform is ready to DPS for your group. A Priest who does not arrive in Shadowform has chosen talents to improve their healing.

All Priests have access to a form of Crowd Control called Mind Control. It’s is rarely used in 5 man dungeons because an enemy that has been controlled does not drop any loot. The Priest is unable to heal or DPS while controlling an enemy. You should never ask your Priest healer to Mind Control during combat.

Priests can be called upon to Crowd Control Undead targets using Shackle Undead. Undead targets are quite rare in dungeons, but if you need to control one, your Priest can help you out.

If you have a Priest in the party you will receive increases to your Stamina and Spirit. Priests can resurrect dead party members when combat has ended.

Rogue

Rogues have only 1 Crowd Control ability, Sap, and it is somewhat time consuming to set up because it must be applied to an enemy before the group enters combat and the Rogue must stealth, unseen, right up to the target to apply it. It will leave the target dazed for some time but it cannot be reapplied.

Shaman

Shamans can help deal damage (by casting spells from a distance, or by attacking up close) or they might offer to heal.

Their Crowd Control ability is called Hex, and, although it appears to be similar to Polymorph, cannot be reapplied immediately and is therefore an inferior option. It does turn the enemy into a frog, though, which is pretty darn cool anyway.

Nobody knows a Shaman’s totems like a Shaman so it’s probably best if you let the Shaman in your party choose which totems they will place down in order to enhance the stats of the group. Their most popular totems can increase attack speed, increase casting speed or increase mana regeneration. You’ll need to stand within about 30 yards of the Shaman’s totems to benefit from them.

Shamans can also self resurrect after dying once per hour instead of releasing. This ability is called Reincarnation, but many players refer to it as “anking” or might ask the Shaman to “ankh” (named after the reagent). Shamans can resurrect other players out of combat.

Warrior

A Warrior makes an excellent tank or damage dealer. They have no Crowd Control whatsoever. They can increase your Attack Power by using their Shout abilities during combat.

Warlock

Warlocks have a large variety of Crowd Control methods available to them. However Fear should never be used to Crowd Control enemies in a dungeons because the results can be unpredictable. In 5 man dungeons Warlocks are occasionally called upon to Banish. When playing alongside their Succubus, they can also cast Seduction to control a Humanoid.

Warlocks have the ability to create their own summoning stone for their party anywhere in the world, including inside a dungeon, as long as they have some help to create it.

Warlocks can also protect 1 chosen party member by creating and applying a Soulstone to that party member. If that player dies they will be prompted with an option to immediately resurrect. This should almost always be given to your group’s healer, who can then resurrect others.

3. Being Critised by Other Players

This is probably the single strongest reason new players are hesitant to jump in and try a 5 man dungeon with other players.

The truth is, most people don’t like being critised. Most people like playing with players who are unlikely to criticize them. Therefore most people want to play with people like you.

I’ve leveled 3 characters to max level. I’ve run dungeons at level 17 – 80. Nobody expects, until you start joining Heroics, that you will play perfectly. Players in level 80 instances do not play perfectly. Everyone is still learning. It’s normal.

It takes practise to get really good at playing your character in a group. No player, no matter how well they play now, played perfectly in their first dungeons. We all have embarrassing stories from our early days when we were still learning the basics.

And if you do make a mistake, and it’s a serious enough mistake to wipe the group (highly unlikely), just confess to it and say you’ll do your best to get it right next try. If you set the tone from the start I think you’ll find more people will be friendly and willing to help than you think.

And remember, in a group you are just one fifth of the success or failure of that group. If the run goes badly don’t assume that it’s all your fault. It probably isn’t.

Good luck. Perhaps I’ll catch you on the Cross-Server Looking For More system.

24 Responses to “All the Colours of the Rainbow:
Dungeon Groups 101”

  1. CigarasNo Gravatar says

    I am a warlock and I can tank, at low levels my voidy tanked rfc, wc, sfk and similar instances, later on at lvl60 I tanked twins in AQ40, at lvl 70 I tanked Leotheras the Blind in SCC, Kal’thas add in TK, Twins in SWP, Illdian himself in BT, at lvl 80 my voidy tanked Sarhtarion with all 3 drakes up 10 man and 25 man version, and yesterday I tanked Accidmaw and Dreadscael on heroic 25 man Northrend Beasts… I’, not talking about all the group quests and 5 man nrmal dungeons where my voidy tanked and was dpsing/healing, for sure the ones mentioned above are not the only clases cappable of tanking, thats why my voidy has taunt and I have Searing Pain.

    P.S. sorry for my bad English

  2. VerileNo Gravatar says

    Great post and great overview.
    .-= Verile’s last blog … Onyxia Guide =-.

  3. One thing about FFXI I thought was cool was that in the teens you were forced to group with people to get through the Dunes. You couldn’t solo there. It was a pain in the butt sometimes, but it taught everyone group play. I shortly quite FFXI after that for WoW though. lol.
    I’ve noticed it’s more women that have the fear of grouping with other people, only because I own a LARGE group of WoW mommies and hear it all the time.
    Notice that in game any?
    .-= Sushicookie’s last blog … A Tree’s Guide to Beasts of Northrend- Part 2 WORMS =-.

  4. UltraNo Gravatar says

    Really enjoyed reading this one :)

    I still remember the first dungeons i did too !

  5. VokNo Gravatar says

    Great blog! Deffinately stealing this to share with the newbies =D
    .-= Vok’s last blog … Friday FTW! =-.

  6. CassandriNo Gravatar says

    Thanks for all the great feedback guys! I was convinced that nobody would want to read this (since there’s certainly nothing new in here).

    @Cigaras: You’re right, a Warlock or Hunter’s pet could successfully tank low level instances. I’ve completed ZF with a Hunter’s pet tanking. But I absolutely would not recommend trying something like this creative for your very first instance run.

    @Sushi: I think some more “forced” group play would be a good thing in World of Warcraft. There are certainly a lot of hints (so many zones leave you with quest chains that end in Dungeon quests) but nothing non-threatening that encourages group play. Remember that quest in Dragonblight were you attack Ruby Dragonshire with the help of an NPC army? I think you could build some great, epic and fun group quests with a concept like that for earlier level zones. Actually I think I did Attack on Undercity with a group (by chance, we were all phased in at the same time) and that was incredibly fun and gives you the same we-are-so-awesome feeling that 5 mans can.

  7. GiantNo Gravatar says

    Well said indeed!

    This should help for a lot of players unknown to and afraid of dungeons.

    If I may, though, I would point out one thing about hunters – Chain-trapping is a bit harder now than it used to be, simply because traps now last 30 seconds from being dropped, and not a minute. That means that the old method of dropping a trap before a pull gets tricky. At least until you get the 20 second duration trap at level 60.
    .-= Giant’s last blog … I feel like an owl =-.

  8. DaekeNo Gravatar says

    It’s weird (to me) that someone would be afraid of DPS-ing in an instance. In my mind, DPS-ing is the easy part. You do what you can, and that’s it. It’s Tanking and Healing that scare me to death. I’m leveling my first Paladin, and am so hesitant to list myself as a Tank in LFG, because I have no confidence in my abilities to do so, and you don’t really get any tanking practice just from leveling outdoors. And Healing, well, I haven’t even started a character yet, because if someone dies, it’s always going to be my fault.

  9. OllieNo Gravatar says

    This is a great article, but i want to share my experiences.
    Up until recently I have been absolutely terrified of groupings for all the reasons you listed. However, I eventually want to get into a decent guild with a raiding element and knew that I just had to get on with it. So being a level 80 I started with UK, UP & Nexus, and have been working up. What I find interesting though is that it took a lot of courage to apply to a group for TotCh and I still have not done half of the other Northrend instances.
    The main problem is that at this stage in the game I still find some players expect me to really know the bosses and unusual stuff like jousting even when I explain that this is my first time for each instance. Most of the people that I’m grouping with are on their first or second level 80 alts and have put in a lot more game time than me. Trust me convincing these people that I deserve their help and advice rather than agression really is hard work and I’ve made some mistakes along the way.
    However, on a positive note, I’m now getting to the stage where I’m coming across groups with someone less experienced than me, and helping these people out makes my day. Particularly if this involves me diplomatically defending my fellow n00b from any unwanted aggro from so-called experienced players.

  10. PeterNo Gravatar says

    Excellent post and article!

    Ever since Classic WoW and a ZG raid gone bad, I haven’t had the courage to join a 5 man run, 10 man run, or even 25 man run…it sounds silly, but really, as the article says, “you’re 1/5th of the group’s success.” It should be all about having fun and enjoying the game, and while we’re all in a dungeon with a job to do, it’s intimidating to get back into the swing of things.

    My bad ZG run back in classic WoW was caused when we repeatedly wiped on the panther boss, and I didn’t understand the directions given to me, and I died pretty quickly. I got screamed at over vent, demoted to the lowest guild rank, and humiliated on our website and server forums and whatnot…I’m in college, am the manager of my town’s beaches, and put up with people far scarier and with more balls than this old guild of mine, so it’s funny why I am so afraid to disappoint 4 virtual strangers, but not angry beach go’ers trying to sneak into my beach!

    All in all, great read, and thanks for the ‘pat on the back’…maybe I’ll get back into grouping/raiding soon!

  11. RagaarNo Gravatar says

    I like how you included shamans as tanks, brings back some fun memories.
    I find most players are put of by just having the responsibilty of not letting the group wipe, and therefore inviting critism, by either not healing, tanking or pulling adds. Or being looking foolish infront of others. Such as an experience of mine of being asked to tank and heal through a low level instance on my first WC run on my Pally just as I was still quite new to the game, the result can easily be predicted. It just encouraged me to do better and not to repeat what happened.

  12. jcNo Gravatar says

    great article. I really enjoyed it. The only thing I would add would be on the warlock abilities section.

    While the custom is to place the soulstone on the healer, an alternate philosophy that seems to be gaining popularity is to place the soulstone on the tank. The reasoning being that if the soulstone is placed on a healer, the group only gains benefit if the group wipes, whereas if the soulstone is placed on the tank, the tank can pop back up and keep tanking before everyone including the healer goes down.

    That being said, the majority of the time the soulstone seems to always go on the healer, but you should always ask the group leader.

  13. BellefonNo Gravatar says

    The class summaries are excellent — other resources are usually too detailed, usually meant for someone playing that class, not just trying to get an understanding of what those other classes bring to the table.

    I don’t know how common this progression is, but it happens to be battlegrounds that are allowing me to slowly begin to try grouping with PUGs. A game quest required me to enter Alterac Valley (my first at L69 — yes, I’m very late to the PvP & grouping aspect of the game), so the game led me there, and I stayed to figure out more.

    While those three sources of fear cited in the article operate in battlegrounds as well as instances, they are somewhat muted since the teams are mostly random and anonymous. It doesn’t mean I wasn’t viciously flamed for doing something wrong, but that mistake isn’t going to follow me around. And after I peeled the post-it note off the corner of my screen to blunt the attacks, I did learn something from at least one patient soul who was actually giving helpful advice, not ranting (@ Ollie, post #9 — you should be awarded a special achievement and pet for your Newb-Shield diplomacy skills.)

    With the chaos of a battlegroup filled with strangers, there’s little time for the randomly designated leader to create an expected role for everyone, so there’s room to experiment with different play-styles and roles without feeling everyone’s looking to you to do something specific.

  14. CassandriNo Gravatar says

    @JC Soulstoning the tank is an excellent solution if your tank is a Druid or Paladin since they can also resurrect players if they use their soulstone after a wipe. When I was leveling up my first two characters you rarely saw anything other than a Warrior tanking and when I leveled my Shaman at the end of BC/start of Wrath I played mostly with a mate who was leveling a Warrior so perhaps my experiences are a bit different.

    @ Bellefon If you get comfortable in the chaos of a battleground group (talk about a pick up group!) then I’m pretty sure your first dungeon is going to seem like a walk in the park!

    @ Ollie Helping a new player enjoy PVE grouping is really rewarding. However it’s very very easy to step on toes and offend a player by offering unwanted advice so I usually wait until they ask me a specific question. Of course, I find it easier to bond with other Priests, although it’s pretty darn rare that I see them making obvious mistakes tbh…

  15. OllieNo Gravatar says

    @Cassandri Please make no mistake, I was talking about intervening when so called experienced players start giving people crap when they just don’t know any better.

    For example I was in ToC HC today and we were struggling with dps. The lowest was a hunter doing less than 1k. I could tell the tank was getting very pissed of with a couple of wipes (he was whispering me about the hunter and healer). When we did finally complete it I decided to pre-emptively intervene before people started laying into him. Since I’m also a hunter and it wasn’t long ago I was at his level. I was able to point him in the direction of some serious immediate upgrades, I even made the Ice Striker’s Cloak for him.

    When helping a sub-performer I’ve found that the clincher is in the opening line. For example: “Dude, your DPS sucks. Please do everyone a favour and don’t come back here until you are doing about 2k”, tends to put some people in a foul mood. Where as: “Hey, you might want to work a little on your DPS before you come back here. Also I had a look at your gear and I have some time right now if you want a hand with upgrades”.

    There is a big difference between being constructively critical and being plain rude.

  16. nikobeNo Gravatar says

    I’ve been playing wow since launch and love leveling & questing (weird I know) and only really enter dungeons or raids when I’m with guildies or friends. My fears of pugging are mainly 1 & 3 in the arcticle but I’ve recently started to get better. One way I’ve found to help is say you have a newly dinged 80 (for this example a tank) with crafted/quest gear join the looking for group on the lower level dungeons, say the 71-79 range of normal dungeons and either tank the lowest level dungeons to get your confidence up and get some blue pure tank gear in the mean time. Then just work your way up through the dungeons till your nicely geared and experienced enough to face the heriocs with random people. You’ll know the dungeons inside out by then as you will have blasted through them as an 80 (bet the lower level people will love having you there).
    .-= nikobe’s last blog … The path less treveled =-.

  17. Andy O.No Gravatar says

    Thanks for this, I’m still uncomfortable running PUGs, and I can run (with a fair amount of success) heroic level dungeons, but it’s embarrassing as hell to ask for help or when someone who’s observant asks you what you’re doing when they assume you’ve been there, done that.

    The advice about telling people you’re a little unsure about the run ahead of time helps. I usually put Newbie in the LFG comment, or just tell the guy who offers me a group that i’ve never run some of these dungeons.

    It’s embarrassing, but occasionally you meet someone who’s cool and takes you through like 4-5 runs in a few short hours and hand holds you the whole way. Makes it awesome. So thanks for writting this, it is appreciated.

    -Corney @ Ner’Zhul

  18. AlexisNo Gravatar says

    It can help a lot to have experience guildies run with you on their appropriate level alts. I mean, they could run you through but whats the fun of that? But my first 5-man (well, we ran it as a 4-man) was Deadmines with my boyfriends’ paly, my shammy (my main), and our friends’ priest and rogue alts. My friend was playing an appropriate level shadow priest so I got to practice healing without being too anxious to think, because if i ran out of mana or got distracted dropping totems she could drop a heal for me. I’ve gotten a lot more confident in healing and such and its nice to have guildies and friends who know what they’re doing. (Not to mention my bf and I duo, and being able to LFM with a tank and a heal makes it easy to find moer!)

  19. CassandriNo Gravatar says

    @Alexis That’s definitely a much better idea than getting a level 80 to run you through! Bet you learned a hell of a lot more about your character by playing that way too.

    @ Andy I’m sure you are reading the situation just fine. I guess what I was trying to say is that there have been a few players who I thought were asking me for advice, but when I offered it, became stand-offish (if that’s even a word). Makes me hesitate to offer advice now unless the person asks me a specific question.

  20. NasirNo Gravatar says

    Fantastic post, I love it. I find it really difficult doing new content as a tank. I clear toc10 every week and we’re 2/5 htoc10 but I am hesitant as a tank to do the daily heroic when is azjol nerub or old kingdom, just because I don’t know the content very well. As a tank people expect not only that you know your own class, but that you know how to mark up targets, know the abilities of mobs (who’s a caster, which one heals etc), the boss strategies but also (the one I struggle with in AN) which bloody way to go!

    Coming up through the levels I was asked to heal an instance (which I have embarassingly forgotten the name of, possilbly crypts) and I died to the shadow aura from the boss which lead to me getting lol’d at, humiliatingly and abused. I respecced heals for the run and respecced back to prot promptly after leaving the group to find another healer. I think there is a great deal of people that have a crappy story like this but the best advice I can give to someone in wotlk is simple advice:
    “hey guys, pretty new to this instance and don’t really know where to go or what to do, so if someone could give me a heads up if there is anything I need to know that’d be awesome”.
    Very rarely will anyone be annoyed enough to boot you and if they are then it’s probably better for u, because they likely would have abused u anyway. Also, be aware if ur own level of skill n gear. Using the example from above, it can be quite difficult carrying 1k dps through heroic instances and even more difficult carrying undergeared heals.
    Sorry, my comment turned into a blog, one I should actually be writtimg right now.
    Love the site. Peace!!
    .-= Nasir’s last blog … We’re live in 5…4…3.. =-.

  21. CassandriNo Gravatar says

    @Nasir Old Kingdom is a bit of a maze, especially at the start where you can go two different ways to reach the first boss. From there to the second boss is quite straightforward. But you can do the last 3 bosses (mushroom man, the chick with the devoted subjects and the insanity “last” boss) in any order. Tip: Up til first boss always kill off the Spellflinger spiders ASAP.

    Azjol Nerub is much more straightforward when it comes to figuring out where to go and what to pull. But the first couple bosses are more like events. Stuff comes at you in waves and you have to just wait it out til you can attack the boss. Tip: The Skirmisher spiders cannot be taunted or have weird aggro so kill them off ASAP.

    We should totally just run these dungeons together some time! Say the word and I’ll put on my healing gear…

  22. I’m the person who made the quote Cass listed above:

    “I am absolutely scared to death about my first group run. As of now… ”

    That was me in response to another thread over at Righteous Orbs.

    For me, it’s a more social type fear. It’s not that I don’t know my class (ret-pal) and how to do my job. Even at level 75 I can put out 1,400+ DPS on same level mobs, and nearly 1,000 on +3 level mobs. (at least as long as I remember my wings, rememeber to keep the rotation, not stand in fire, yada yada yada… lol)

    The problem for me & my other half is simply trying to find a group to play with. Most actively recruiting guilds are semi-serious about raiding. (we aren’t/won’t be, we don’t have the time) And the thought of having my first (& second, third, etc) radis/instances being pugs makes my teeth itch. Also, if you aren’t level 80, trying to find ANY groups is a challenge.

    It’s like being 16 and moving to a new school; I know my math, I know my english and I know my science, BUT I don’t want to look like an doofus, not knowing *where* to go, not knowing who to talk to, where to stand, etc. It’s fear of the unknown more than anything. And yes, fear of looking like a fool.

    Cheers, and nice write up!
    .-= SlikRX/Balthazario’s last blog … To All My Friends in Low Places =-.

  23. CassandriNo Gravatar says

    @Slik I think the cross-server LFM will definitely help you a group if you’ve been struggling to get numbers. Remember even if you do make a mistake or look like a noob, is that so bad? Everyone else in the group will be making mistakes, too, I guarantee it.

  24. NinielNo Gravatar says

    Great post! I feel all nostalgic now! :)

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